Thankfulness comes in all sizes

I read a post by Elle Todd the other day, Being Thankful, that brought to mind something we don’t often recognize: the things for which we can be most grateful are oftentimes not the obvious. In fact, they may have felt distinctly like not-so-great moments when they happened, and only in hindsight do we realize we are, after all is said and done, thankful they occurred.

I’ve written at great length—more than I ever thought I would—about the blessings that have come about as a direct result of how we handled ourselves during a time of great upheaval in our family. Most of those blessings have made themselves known only now, almost eleven years later. I won’t rehash the stuff I’ve already blogged about, but feel free to read my earlier posts (there aren’t that many to sift through, since this is a new blog) if you’re curious.

I had a huge post (big surprise there) in the works, based around all the “closed door/opened window” or “silver lining” things in my life, but deleted just about the entire thing when I realized it was so detailed as to be snore-inducing. (Elle, I really did want to steal your idea, but your post didn’t bore me and mine did, so you win this one.)

What it all boiled down to were two things: family and friends. Those two things were at the heart of my entire post. Everything I am thankful for somehow involves them. Finances, health, material possessions—they wax and wane, and we adapt, but the things that affect me most can always be traced back to friends or family.

It may sound trite to fall back on the ol’ friends & family thing, but I am sincere when I say I don’t take these things for granted. My dad died two years ago; he didn’t always have the best advice, he’d give our Christmas gifts back to us (“I don’t really need this; go ahead and just stick it in your car and take it home with you”) and he was kind of a Cliff Claven in many ways, but he loved us and loved his grandchildren. He had no tact, but you always knew where you stood with him, and he was generous with what he had. My mom is still around and doing well, even though we thought we were going to lose her within months of my dad dying. The cancer that seemed to be so prevalent throughout her bones two years ago is miraculously sparse right now with no chemo and no radiation. Big Thankful.

My in-laws rank right up there on my list of Big Thankfuls. Make all the mother-in-law jokes you want; you can all be jealous of me because my in-laws are terrific, from Pop & Gramma all the way down to the youngest cousin. I’m stuck by marriage with a family I would have chosen anyway.

This year has been a time of transition for me. Transitions are not always thankful moments, but this one is. I feel as if I’m settling in and beginning yet another season. This one involves my kids being older and a little more independent, which has allowed me, in turn, to be a little more independent. I’m not sure if that’s leading me to be more versatile or just lazier, since I don’t have to chase after them anymore. Still, I’m thankful for the next phase, because it’s different and new, which usually means exciting and interesting.

Being in-de-pen-dent (hearing it in my head as pronounced by Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer) means I can pursue activities that interest me—I’m not limited to the things in which my children are involved. As enjoyable as those things are, I’m there for them, not for me. I don’t mind waiting my turn, as long as I get a turn once in awhile.

This year, it seems, is my turn. Yay, me! Through a quirky turn of events, I ended up with a freelance copy editing job and a handful of new acquaintances who have very quickly become friends. Some of them, I swear, are long-lost family, and there’s not a thing you can say to convince me otherwise. The Big Thankful in this instance is not only having a job I enjoy exceedingly, but also knowing there are more people out there just like me. That may be scary to some of you, but trust me, it’s a relief to me. [Side note: this post ended up delayed by an almost-two-hour Facebook chat with one of those crazy people, and I hurt myself laughing. But I’m still thankful. Painfully thankful. And I know she’s probably hurting, too, so we’re even.]

The thing for which I’m most thankful, though, is this: I don’t have to wait until Thanksgiving to find a list of Big Thankfuls, or even Little Thankfuls. They’re there every day. For instance, I wake up. Every single day, I wake up. And if you don’t think that’s something to be thankful about, then try not waking up.

It doesn’t have to be anything grand or complex. It can be serious or funny. As long-term as “I’m married to the man of my dreams.” As short-term as “That conversation was hilarious.”

The important thing is to recognize it for what it is: a blessing. A bonus. A woo hoo moment. A victory.

Life with family and friends. Two absolutely indispensable things, in my book.

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4 thoughts on “Thankfulness comes in all sizes

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  1. Beautiful post, Lynda. And well said!

    Those blessings in disguise truly are the ones that we get the most out of. Even if we don’t realize it later on, they shape us in such ways that we become the person we didn’t know we could be. So yes, finding light in the darkness is definitely something to be thankful for.

    Family and friends? Waking up every morning? Wonderful husbands? The small things, such as having teeth? Always at the top of the list 🙂
    Way to get back even with that two-hour Facebook chatter, make her hurt with laughter! Oh goodness, here I go again lol Always a fun time 😛

  2. Some exceedingly clever person once said, “Happiness isn’t getting what you want, it’s wanting what you already have.” It isn’t trite or insignificant, and good for you that you recognize the value of what/whom is in your life. Happy Thanksgiving!

    1. Good words, Elle. A friend of mine posted today on Facebook: What if we woke up today with only the things for which we’ve been thankful?

      I hope your day of retail madness provides at least a few quiet moments for you with family.

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